VIDEO: Shoppers head out Black Friday instead of Boxing Day in search of holiday gifts

VIDEO: Shoppers head out Black Friday instead of Boxing Day in search of holiday gifts

Interac Corp. recorded four-per-cent jumps in debit transactions on Black Friday for the past three years

Canadian shoppers craving a deal increasingly turn to Black Friday — a sales bonanza imported from America, where retailers long slashed prices the day after their Thanksgiving holiday — at the expense of another sales spree, Boxing Day.

The shift comes as consumers increasingly plan to spend before Christmas and check gifts off their holiday lists, industry watchers say, and the change offers retailers a slight edge.

“(Black Friday) is fulfilling an unmet need,” said Michael Leblanc, a senior retail adviser with the Retail Council of Canada, an advocacy group. It gives consumers the chance to secure deals on presents rather than shop after the gift-giving season is over.

Forty-three per cent of respondents to the group’s second annual holiday shopping survey planned to purchase items on Black Friday — up from 40 per cent the previous year. Only 34 per cent of respondents intended to shop on Boxing Day.

A survey by Deloitte Canada showed a similar disenchantment with the Dec. 26 sales day. Only one out of three respondents wanted to shop during the stretched out, week-long event. The same number said the earlier Black Friday and Cyber Monday sales changed their habits for Boxing Day.

Spending figures from previous years suggest this shifting consumer sentiment is ongoing.

Canadians made six per cent more debit transactions on last year’s Black Friday than in 2017, according to data from payment processor Moneris. Black Friday also earned the title of biggest shopping day of the year for transaction volume.

Meanwhile, Boxing Day growth slowed in 2018, and the Friday and Saturday before Christmas surpassed it in transactions and dollars spent, the company said.

READ MORE: There were 96,000 crashes in B.C. parking lots in 2018, ICBC says

The shopping day “has dropped significantly in popularity with consumers,” Moneris said.

Interac Corp. recorded jumps in debit transactions on Black Friday of more than four per cent for the past three years, while the total amount spent rose steadily as well. Its yearly growth in both categories for Boxing Day was higher, but the overall number of Interac debit transactions and the total volume of spending are about half of those seen on Black Friday.

Consumers choose the pre-holiday sales because they want to buy gifts at a good price, said Leblanc, which the timing of Boxing Day doesn’t offer.

The retail council found 77 per cent of Canadians’ holiday budgets dedicated to gifts — with the remainder for personal purchases.

It also helps that Black Friday sales have expanded beyond those considered go-to categories for Boxing Day discounts, like appliances and apparel, said Leblanc. Airlines, car dealerships, home decor and improvement chains, phone companies and others now advertise deals for the unofficial kickoff of the holiday spending season.

“It feels like it’s evolved to be everything.”

It’s not likely that merchants hurt over the changing momentum, said Marty Weintraub, a partner and national retail practice leader at Deloitte Canada.

“A lot of it is just shifting sales from one period to a different period,” he said, but having the sale earlier in the year “does give retailers a slight advantage.”

Consumers often try to set a budget for holiday spending, he said, and may have more available funds before the holidays, as well as more energy to shop.

It’s also better for retailers to make sales earlier rather than engage in massive markdowns in an attempt to rid themselves of inventory they didn’t sell during the holidays, he said, which is what Boxing Day has traditionally been about.

“That’s not the best game to play,” Weintraub said.

Those weary of pressure to offer more discounts on Black Friday can participate in ways other than sales, added Leblanc.

“Not all retailers necessarily need to go down the heavy discounting route,” he said.

PHOTOS: Black Friday frenzy goes global – and not everyone’s happy

Shops can bring in special products to launch on Black Friday, for example, when they’re likely to see increased foot and online traffic.

And, it seems, retailers would be smart to join the marketing effort in some form.

Weintraub anticipates Black Friday will continue to see growth at the expense of Boxing Day for some time to come.

“I don’t think we’ve hit the peak yet.”

Aleksandra Sagan, The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Residents line up socially distanced at the Seedy Saturday event, held at the Lobelco Hall parking lot from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. April 3 with strict COVID-19 restrictions and precautions in place. (Nicole Kaechele photo)
Seedlings, plants and seeds offered at Seedy Saturday

“It was a fairly good turnout,” noted Elizabeth Howard

The Bella Coola Valley Arts Council (BCVAC) has recently received two awards totaling $40,000 from the province-wide British Columbia Arts Council, part of the StrongerBC: BC’s Economic Recovery Plan. The grants are to be used to stimulate local arts communities and to help them cope with impacts from the COVID-19 pandemic. (Photo submitted)
Bella Coola Valley Arts Council receives $40,000 for local projects

The grants will be used to stimulte local arts communities and help them cope with the pandemic

Nuxalk Sputc Crew technician Scmlh (Jason Moody) walks in Bella Coola River towards sputc holding tank with cinematographer Louvens Remy (photo submitted)
Documentary to highlight importance of sputc for Nuxalk Nation

Sputc: We Shall Eat When the River is Full is a cinematic tale of wealth, loss and recovery

Carver Ken Sheen had almost finished work on a large cowboy carving commissioned by the City of Williams Lake to replace the original overlooking the Stampede Grounds when fire broke out Friday, April 18 at his property between Williams Lake and Quesnel. (Pine River Carving Facebook photos)
Nearly completed cow boss statue commissioned by City of Williams Lake lost to fire

Carver Ken Sheen lost the statue, all his tools and his shop in the blaze

Spring flooding is causing damage at Tl’etinqox First Nation west of Williams Lake. (Isidore Harry photo)
UPDATE: Spring freshet causes road damage at Tl’etinqox First Nation

Other damaged sections of Highway 20 are also under repairs

Public health restrictions on non-essential travel and vacation bookings are being increased in B.C. (B.C. government)
Out-of-region B.C. vacation bookings, RV ferry reservations to be refused, Horgan says

B.C. extends COVID-19 indoor dining, group fitness ban until May 25

Families of two of three workers killed in a train derailment near Field, B.C., in 2019 have filed lawsuits accusing Canadian Pacific of gross negligence. The derailment sent 99 grain cars and two locomotives off the tracks. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
Families of workers killed in Field train derailment allege negligence in lawsuit

Lawsuits allege the workers weren’t provided a safe work environment

(New Westminster Police)
4 youth arrested after 30-person brawl in New Westminster leaves 1 seriously injured

Police are looking for witnesses who saw the incident take place

South Surrey’s Paul Cottrell, who works with the DFO, tows a grey whale out of Semiahmoo Bay Sunday. (Contributed photo)
Dead whale floating near White Rock towed to shore for necropsy

Animal has been dead since at least April 15

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Sunday’s storm rocked one of the ferries crossing Kootenay Lake. Photo: Dirk Jonker
VIDEO: Storm makes for wild ferry ride across Kootenay Lake

The video was captured by ferry employee Dirk Jonker

Dr. Bonnie Henry gives her daily media briefing regarding Covid-19 for the province of British Columbia in Victoria, B.C, Monday, December 7, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
BREAKING: Toddler marks youngest British Columbian to die related to COVID-19

Child one of eight people to die from virus this weekend

Chakalaka Bar & Grill remains open in defiance of orders from Island Health to close. (Cole Schisler photo)
B.C. health authority seeks injunction against restaurant defying COVID-19 orders

Chakalaka Bar and Grill plans to continue serving customers without public health compliance

Pharmacist Barbara Violo arranges all the empty vials of the Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccines that she has provided to customers at the Junction Chemist which is a independent pharmacy during the COVID-19 pandemic in Toronto, on Monday, April 19, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
B.C. to open up AstraZeneca vaccines for all people 40+, set up clinics in hot spots

A total of 13 neighbourhoods and communities will receive the AstraZeneca vaccine

Most Read