B.C. Ombudsperson Jay Chalke. (Submitted)

Watchdog praises changes made so far after B.C.’s health worker misfirings scandal

Ombusperson Jay Chalke gives an update on the recommendations he made following the 2012 misfirings

The B.C. government has implemented most of a watchdog’s recommendations stemming from the misfiring of seven health ministry employees in 2012, a report released Tuesday said.

Last year, the Liberal government apologized for the “flawed investigation and rushed decision” that lead to the firings of seven health ministry researchers who were assessing drugs for eligibility under the province’s Pharmacare program.

The health ministry initially said a confidential database of B.C. patients who had taken various drugs had been misused, and some of the researchers appeared to have conflicts of interest.

READ MORE: Cash, apologies coming for fired health researchers

READ MORE: B.C. set to close ‘gaps’ in ministry research six years after health researcher firings

A 2017 report released by Ombudsperson Jay Chalke made 41 recommendations that broadly covered public and individual apologies, ex-gratia payments returning personal possession and better protection for whistleblowers.

On Tuesday, Chalke said 37 of those recommendations have been brought in, including a $500,000 University of Victoria scholarship set up for health worker Roderick MacIsaac, who committed suicide after being fired.

“The effort and collaboration required to make these important improvements in the public service has been very significant and I am heartened by the progress to date,” said Chalke. “Taken together, these steps help mitigate the risk that the series of events in 2012 could reoccur.”

The four outstanding recommendations are assessing the financial impact on employees who were disciplined but not fired; finalizing payments to contractors; implementing recommendations related to the settlement terms of reopened grievances of the fired bargaining unit employees; and continuing to create a more positive workplace culture at the Ministry of Health.


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Oregon couple’s stolen truck located at Deep Creek, boat still missing

Jim and Kathy Jantz are thankful for the help they have received so far in Williams Lake

B.C. sockeye returns drop as official calls 2019 ‘extremely challenging’

Federal government says officials are seeing the same thing off Alaska and Washington state

U.S. couple ‘devastated’ truck and boat stolen in Williams Lake overnight

Family from Oregon appealing for assistance to help find stolen items

Police name second suspect, lay kidnapping and attempted murder charges in connection with Rudy Johnson Bridge incidents

Drynock is considered dangerous, do not approach him and call the local RCMP detachment immediately

Skeena-Bulkley Valley candidates react to finding Trudeau broke ethics law

The election campaign is heating up before the writ has even dropped

New police force in Surrey must avoid VPD, RCMP errors made in Pickton case: Oppal

Boots are scheduled to be on the ground by spring 2021

Conan turns to the Property Brothers for tips on buying Greenland

Jonathan Scott suggests removing glaciers and mountains to bring in ‘more natural light’

Forests minister visits B.C. town rocked by multiple mill shutdowns

A third of Mackenzie turns out for rally, not much to cheer about

B.C. music teacher accused of sexual misconduct involving girls

Police believe other victims could be out there after the arrest of Lamar Victor Alviar

B.C. family stranded in Croatia desperate to come home

Funds being raised to bring back mom and two children

B.C. man on trial for daughters’ murders says an intruder broke in

Andrew Berry takes stand in his defense for December 2017 deaths of young daughters

‘Plenty of time for a deal’: Teachers’ union expects kids back in school on Sept. 3

BCTF says class size, composition at the heart of the issue

Province funds new shuttle buses for 13 B.C. senior centres

Activity, socializing helps maintain health, Adrian Dix says

Most Read