One of the five bears admitted to the North Island Wildlife Recovery Centre this year. Four of the bears are in the bear enclosure at the centre while the fifth is still in intensive care. — Lauren Collins photo One of the five bears admitted to the North Island Wildlife Recovery Centre this year. Four of the bears are in the bear enclosure at the centre while the fifth is still in intensive care. — Lauren Collins photo

VIDEO: Wildlife centre reminds people to be bear aware

Bear cubs admitted to centre after mothers put down

The North Island Wildlife Recovery Centre is once again reminding people to be bear aware.

Since June, the Errington centre has admitted five bear cubs. The two most recent bear cubs, from Port Alberni, and one from Black Creek were admitted after their moms became habituated to humans and had to be destroyed, said Tawny Molland, animal care technician at the North Island Wildlife Recovery Association (NIWRA).

“Their moms were starting to get into garbage and they were starting to get aggressive, and so unfortunately the COs (conservation officers) had to make that decision to euthanize at that point,” Molland said.

Molland said bears are starting to fatten up for the winter.

“They know that there is a food source out there — garbage — along with fruit trees, so that typically brings the bears closer in to population.”

The point NIWRA and other organizations are trying to get out to the public, Molland said, is that people need to secure their garbage.

“Don’t put it out the night before, that’s a huge attraction for the bears,” said Molland, adding that people can look into bear-proof containers or store cans in a garage or shed.

RELATED: Bear spotted in Qualicum Beach

Molland said people should also pick up any fruit that has fallen off trees. She also said NIWRA accepts the fruits as donations to feed the bear cubs.

Molland said the bear cubs will be under the care of NIWRA for another year, until they can be released into the wild next fall. She said the centre typically keeps the cubs for 18 months.

The five bears, Molland said, were born around February of this year.

Molland said a female cub from Woss was one of the first cubs admitted to NIWRA this year, but the centre doesn’t know the circumstances of what happened to the bear. Molland said the cub is still in intensive care. Her name is Rae.

The next four cubs — one from Black Creek, one of Sooke and two from Port Alberni — have been living together in the bear enclosure at the centre.

The bear from Sooke, Molland said, was brought to the centre after its mother was hit by a car and was no longer able to car for the cub. Her name is Tim, short for Timbalina.

The cub from Black Creek, James, was admitted to the centre after his mother was becoming aggressive.

The two most recent bear cubs, Dean and Black Jack from Port Alberni, were brought in on Oct. 11, after their mother also showed signs of aggression.

While visitors can’t see the bears in the enclosure, people may observe the bears on a closed-circuit TV at the centre.

NIWRA, located at 1240 Leffler Rd. in Errington, is now open year-round. For more information, visit www.niwra.org.

Just Posted

Oil tanker ban to be reviewed by committee

Indigenous groups for and against Bill C-48 travel to Ottawa to influence the Senate’s decision

Nuslhiixwta – A Place of Treasures – celebrates new name

After months of thought and deliberation, Healthy Beginnings now has a new name.

‘Are we going to play?’ Alberta boy with rare illness no big deal for classmates

Porter Stanley is one of 30 people in the world to be diagnosed with Beare-Stevenson syndrome, a craniofacial disorder.

Publication ban on name of girl killed in Abbotsford school lifted

Reimer’s family had supported an application by Black Press to lift ban

B.C. securities regulator probes ‘most expansive’ alleged trading scheme in its history

Liht Cannabis Corp states it’s doing internal investigation, welcomes BC Securities Commission probe

Air passenger rights: 6 things about what the Liberals are offering

For 3- to 6-hour delays, compensation is $400. Between 6 and 9 hours, $700. Over 9 hours is $1,000

RCMP, civilian vehicles rammed in North Okanagan incident

Police attempt to stop truck near Enderby, thought to be tied to alleged Salmon Arm armed robbery

New biker gang with ties to Hells Angels crops up in Lower Mainland

The Street Reapers were formed late last year and have been seen in Fort Langley.

10-lane George Massey bridge too big, B.C. study says

Consultants say replacement tunnel cost similar to new bridge

Couple caught up in B.C. Legislature bomb plot to learn their fate

John Nuttall and Amanda Korody were arrested as part of an undercover RCMP sting on Canada Day 2013

Ryan Reynolds to narrate movie about B.C.’s Great Bear Rainforest

Vancouver-born actor known for Deadpool movies will voice film to be released Feb. 15, 2019

Most Read