Habs netminder Carey Price gives a big hug to a young fan whose mom’s dying wish was to see her son have his dreams come true and meet his idol. (Image courtesy of Facebook)

Habs netminder Carey Price gives a big hug to a young fan whose mom’s dying wish was to see her son have his dreams come true and meet his idol. (Image courtesy of Facebook)

VIDEO: NHL goaltender Carey Price comforts young fan who lost mom to cancer

She died before she could make son’s dream come true to meet Price

The family of a young boy who lost his mom to cancer said words cannot described their gratitude for the kindness shown by Montreal Canadiens netminder Carey Price after an emotional meeting between the two recently.

The boy, named Anderson, starts to cry when he is approached by Price and the two share a long embrace which is seen in a touching video that has been viewed by millions since the boy’s aunt, Tammy Whitehead, posted it last Saturday, Feb 23, on Facebook.

Whitehead said it was Anderson’s mother’s dying wish for him to meet Price, his idol, but she passed away before that could happen. It was through the generosity of friends that Anderson’s dream came true during a morning skate, she said.

“As you can see in the video, Carey Price was a class act not only giving Anderson two signed sticks, a signed puck, signing his jersey and mini stick but he also gave him the biggest hug. Words cannot describe how much this meant to Anderson and we are forever grateful to this wonderful man.”

Price, who was raised at Anahim Lake and played hockey in Williams Lake, is well known for his generous nature.

Several Cariboo Chilcotin non-profit groups have benefited multiple times from thousands of dollars in donations of hockey gear from Price, which was arranged by his father, Jerry.

READ MORE: Price inspires youth through hockey donations

The Habs hero and his wife, Angela, are also First Nations, Métis and Inuit ambassadors for Breakfast Club of Canada and have been greeting winners from the Shooting for the Stars contest put on by the Breakfast Club of Canada and Air Canada every winter for several years now. The contest sees children from Price’s hometown of Anahim Lake, Williams Lake and Quesnel win a trip to see Price, who always encourages the children to work hard and do their best.

READ MORE:Trip to meet Price ‘way better than I thought:’ Sireasha Alphonse

READ MORE: Student meets idol, Carey Price


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