The Tsilhqot'in have declared the grizzly hunt illegal in their territory

Tsilhqot’in leaders take aim at 2015 grizzly hunt

The Nation said it does not support trophy hunting for grizzlies in their traditional territory.

  • Apr. 27, 2015 4:00 p.m.

According to an article and video produced by the Vancouver Observer and circulated by the Tsilhqot’in National Government Friday, the Nation said it does not support trophy hunting for grizzlies in their traditional territory.

In a video interview, Xeni Gwet’in Chief Roger William said he was surprised by the government’s decision to open up grizzly hunts in the Chilcotin and that they have many concerns surrounding the decision.

“In our culture (the grizzly hunt) just doesn’t make sense. They live on the land with us …  so now you open up for a grizzly hunt — that’s a big concern. We don’t feel that the government has really made an informed decision.”

A Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations spokesperson said Monday the Cariboo hunt was re-opened because grizzly population information and trends indicated that a limited hunt was sustainable. For 2015, grizzly hunting limited entry hunting allocations were increased from three to nine.

“The principles behind the ministry’s decisions are: a scientifically informed population estimate; estimates of sustainable human-caused mortality rates; and deliberately conservative mortality limits, “ Greig Bethel said. “Ministry biologists determine the number of authorizations to be issued based on five-year allowable annual harvest, and success rates.”

However, Bethel noted as a result of the Supreme Court of Canada Decision, Tsilhqot’in Title Lands are not publicly available for hunting, angling or trapping at this time.

“The Tsilhqot’in National Government and Xeni Gwet’in have provided conditional consent for registered guides to carry out hunting on Aboriginal Title Land for the 2015 season,” Bethel said emphasizing the Tsilhqot’in Title Lands are not within the management units that were re-opened for an LEH grizzly bear hunt in 2014.

William said the Tsilhqot’in consider the grizzly sacred and will only kill a grizzly for ceremonial or safety purposes, and in that case they will eat the meat.

Bethel said consultation with the Tsilhqot’in was conducted on all proposed 2014 Cariboo Region hunting regulations including the grizzly bear hunt.

“First Nations food, social, and ceremonial rights are provided for prior to any issuance of opportunities for either resident hunters or guide outfitters,” Bethel noted, adding for area management zone 5-05, one grizzly hunt authorization was issued and for area 5-06, two authorizations were issued, however, no grizzly bears were harvested in either unit.

Grizzly bear hunting in the southwest Chilcotin is being managed conservatively, Bethel said.

“If hunting or other grizzly mortality exceeds acceptable mortality limits, the hunt can be reduced or even completely closed.”

 

Just Posted

“It’s something you’re called to do”: Cullen reflects on time as MP

For Nathan Cullen, it’s not goodbye, it’s farewell.

Local artist Sesyaz Saunders’ art on display at YVR

Saunders worked with renowned artist Robert Davidson on a large panel

VIDEO: ‘Avengers: Endgame’ to be re-released with new footage

‘Avatar’ holds global box office record at $2.788 billion, while ‘Endgame’ stands at $2.743 billion…

B.C. teen killed by falling tree near Victoria

Second youth also injured in freak incident during field trip at Camp Barnard near Sooke

Elias Pettersson wins Calder Trophy as NHL’s top rookie

Vancouver forward first Canuck to win award since Pavel Bure in 1992

FVRD chair calls B.C. incineration plan for Philippines waste ‘disturbing’

Metro Vancouver ‘uniquely capable’ of safely disposing of waste coming back to Canada, say officials

VIDEO: Acknowledging skeptics, finance minister vows to build Trans Mountain project

Bill Morneau said he recognizes ‘huge amount of anxiety’ in Calgary over future of oil and gas sector

Shovels could be in the ground on Trans Mountain by September, CEO says

Ian Anderson points to weeks likely required for NEB to reinstate 2016 regulatory record

Scorpion gives birth after hitching ride in B.C. woman’s luggage

A Vancouver woman inadvertently brought the animal home from a trip to Cuba

RCMP allows officers to grow beards

Members can now wear beards and goatees, as long as they’re neatly groomed

Girl, 10, poisoned by carbon monoxide at B.C. campsite could soon return home

Lucille Beaurain died and daughter Micaela Walton, 10, was rushed to B.C. Children’s Hospital on May 18

Most Read