TSB makes two safety advisories in probe of B.C. train derailment that killed three

The CP Rail train went off the tracks near the B.C.-Alberta border in February

The Transportation Safety Board of Canada has sent two safety advisories to federal regulators as part of their investigation into the train derailment that killed three men near Field, B.C. in February.

TSB released its latest update into the fatal incident Thursday, advising Transport Canada to ensuree that effective safety procedures are applied to all trains stopped in emergency cases on both “heavy grade” and “mountain grades.”

Transport Canada should also review the efficacy of air brake system inspections and maintenance procedures for grain hopper cars used in unit train operations, the letter advises, and ensure that those cars will be operated safely at all times.

READ MORE: Train that derailed and killed three ‘just started moving on its own’

The derailment on Feb. 4 sent 99 cars and two locomotives off the tracks at the Spiral Tunnels, near the B.C.-Alberta border.

Conductor Dylan Paradis, engineer Andrew Dockrell, and trainee Daniel Waldenberger-Bulmer were killed. All three were from Calgary.

READ MORE: Three identified in fatal train derailment in Field

TSB investigators said it appears the train somehow began to move on its own after the crew had brought it to a halt. The maximum speed in that area is 20 miles per hour, and once in motion, the train began to move faster down the steep terrain.

“There was not anything the crew did. The train just started moving on its own,” said railway and pipeline investigator James Carmichael at the time.

WATCH: Scenes from Canadian Pacific freight train derailment in B.C.

Shortly after the incident, Transport Canada issued a mandatory hand-braking protocol for when a train is stopped on a mountain grade.

At the time, Transportation Minister Marc Garneau said the order will remain in effect as long as necessary.

READ MORE: Transport Canada orders new braking protocol after fatal CP derailment in Field

The TSB has collected data from the accident site and the locomotives, conducted interviews, examined and photographed the wreckage, and identified components for further examination.

– With files from Ashley Wadhwani and Liam Harrap

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