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Pandemic reveals inequalities in who can work from home: Statistics Canada

More education and higher income increases chances of working from home successfully

A study released by Statistics Canada Monday (June 8) showed that not all Canadians can work from home. Many people worked from home during the spring months to prevent COVID-19 transmission, although some have now returned as offices and businesses open up.

The data found that although 40 per cent of Canadians work jobs that can be done from home, not all people are equally likely to have such a job.

Researchers found that among dual-earner families, higher income jobs are more likely to be done from home.

When Statistics Canada broke up earnings into 10 levels, it found that just eight per cent of the lowest earners could work from home, compared to 54 per cent of the highest bracket.

Researchers also found that primary income earners with more education are more likely to be able to work from home. About 66 per cent of earners with a bachelor’s degree can work from home, compared to just 30 per cent of those with only a high school diploma.

Women are also more likely to be able to work from home. Looking at all education levels, 33 per cent of men are able to work from home, compared to 50 per cent of women. However, single men’s chances to be able to work from home rise a percent above single women’s when both have bachelor’s degrees or higher, at 66 per cent and 65 per cent, respectively. Similar percentages are observed in lone parents, single-earner and dual-earner couples.

READ MORE: How organizations, businesses can go digital during the COVID-19 pandemic

READ MORE: Sweats are in, slacks are out: Could ‘work-leisure’ become business as usual?


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

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