Barred owl, found in South Surrey and is said to be less than one year old, was killed after eating rat poison. (Contributed photo)

Owl found dead after eating rat poison leaves B.C. woman concerned

After finding the owl on her Surrey property, Christine Trozzo says the poison is a concern for kids

A B.C. resident says she’s concerned for the safety of her pets after learning that an owl, which was found dead on her property Thursday, was killed after it ate rat poison.

Christine Trozzo, who lives on South Surrey, noticed an abnormally lethargic barred owl perched high in her birch tree on Wednesday.

With a hunch something wasn’t quite right with the bird, she called Orphaned Wildlife Rehabilitation Society (OWL), based in Delta.

OWL raptor manager Rob Hope told Trozzo that it was unsafe to retrieve the bird because of how high it was in the tree, but told her to keep an eye on the animal and call him immediately if the bird moved to the ground.

The next day, Trozzo found the bird’s body in her yard.

Later that day, Hope went to investigate how the bird had died, and said that the juvenile owl was in perfect health, but it “just dropped dead.”

“Just examining the bird myself, from what I saw and where the bird was found. The fact that the bird is healthy, mouth is pale, and there’s a little bit of blood there. It appears that it was a poison,” he said Friday. “We’re 90 per cent sure it’s poison.”

Hope said that the owl most likely ate a poisoned rat. After a rat ingests poison, which contains the chemical bromadiolone, it becomes lethargic, making it an “easy target” for birds of prey.

“That’s exactly how it happened,” Hope said. “Once that bird ingests it, the bird’s got days before, of course, it will die. It’s an anticoagulant. Basically, the bird is bleeding and there’s no stopping it.”

Trozzo, who owns two small terrier dogs, said she was “really upset” to learn of the cause of death. She said she will be posting a bulletin around her neighbourhood to warn pet owners and young parents to be extra cautious when out for a walk.

“My dog, a while back, killed a squirrel. I don’t imagine that they would ever eat it, but I thought geez murphy, that’s dangerous to animals. Never mind just birds, and what about children?”

Hope shared Trozzo concern over a child inadvertently eating rat poison.

“Who’s to say a kid’s not going to be the next one to go?” Hope said.

Hope said that rat poison is required to be locked in a stationed box, however, there’s a chance that the rat could grab the poison and remove it from the box.

He said the poison is a “cool blueish green colour,” and that it may attract the eye of a young child.

OWL will send the dead raptor to a federal agency for a toxicology test, which Hope expects will confirm his suspicion that the owl was poisoned.

Raptors dying from eating poisoned wild life happens “more often than not,” and just last month, Hope retrieved two dead barred owls – both suspected of dying from poison – from the same area in North Vancouver.

“As far as pure numbers go, we don’t know… but it’s definitely out there. There’s no ifs, ands or buts about it. It does happen,” Hope said.

Hope said the OWL organization are advocates for rat traps and “removing poison from the environment.”

“It’s not only birds, but it’s dogs, cats, kids. Almost anything is susceptible to it.”

Trozzo said it’s “common knowledge” that there are rats in South Surrey, and that people should use traps instead of poison.

“What’s wrong with people?” she said.



aaron.hinks@peacearchnews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

“Huge disappointment” as BCVT learns Northern Sea Wolf will not sail this summer

The Nimpkish is arrriving near-empty as frustrated travelers can’t get to Bella Bella for transfer

Protection order issued after Bella Coola bear attack

Fruit trees to be removed after sow grizzly defended cubs and sent man to hospital

Bella Coola enjoys 33rd Annual Valley Ridge Riders Rodeo

Sunny skies on Monday added a welcome touch to an otherwise damp weekend

First Nation pipeline protesters erect ‘tiny homes’ in B.C. Park

Kanahus Manuel and Tiny House Warriors say more homes being constructed in park

France doubles up Croatia 4-2 to win World Cup

Played in Moscow Russia, latest Fifa World Cup marks the highest scoring final since 1966

REPLAY: B.C.’s best video this week

In case you missed it, here’s a look at replay-worthy highlights from across the province this week

Riptide, CVUSC paved the way for varsity soccer players

Chloe Gummer has become a leader at VIU

B.C. woman disappointed after family asked for ID at townhouse complex pool

Surrey woman says it’s not the first time she has experienced racial profiling at the complex

Park pipeline protesters say arrest is a ‘declaration of war’

Group behind North Thompson River Provincial Park occupation protest says arrest is ‘declaration of war’

A day of deals at Amazon, and at its rivals

Online retail giant extends annual ‘Prime Day’ promotion to 36 hours

Alert B.C. campers raise alarm and avert potential propane disaster

Salmon Arm camper lodges a complaint with Technical Safety BC after motorhome tank is over-filled.

Non-union construction industry fears exclusion in B.C.

Premier John Horgan announces new Crown corporation for public works

UPDATED: Putin says he wanted Trump to win in 2016, didn’t interfere

The two leaders arrived Monday at Helsinki’s presidential palace for a long-awaited summit

In TV interview, Trump claims queen called Brexit ‘complex’

Asked the queen’s view on Brexit, Trump said: “She said it’s a very complex problem.”

Most Read