Norman James Hall with completed canvases, taken at a storage locker. (Photo by Kazuho Yamamoto)

Norman James Hall Launches Six Banners to Bring Indigenous Chiefs and Nobles to life

The project is commissioned by City of Vancouver’s Cultural Services and Engineering Services

  • Nov. 26, 2018 1:30 a.m.

Press Release

Downtown Eastside-based indigenous artist/residential school survivor Norman James Hall launched a new public artwork “The Chiefs and Nobles” at Vancouver Public Library’s library square promenade on November 12, 2018. The project is commissioned by City of Vancouver’s Cultural Services and Engineering Services.

“Chiefs and Nobles symbolizes the strength and the paths of knowledge of these six distinguished Indigenous leaders and artists. I decided to paint these portraits to bring the Chiefs and the artists to life, and stimulate interest in finding out more about Indigenous arts, culture, history, and its future,” said Hall.

The Chiefs and Nobles painted on the banners are Chief Jim Pollard, Chief Alex Clellamin, Chief Sam Pootlass, Chief Willie Mack, artist Arthur Shilling, and artist Norval Morrisseau. The four Nuxalk Chiefs are related to his family history and his relatives. The two artists, Arthur Shilling and Norval Morrisseau, come from Anishnaabe ancestry. They survived residential school, and became internationally recognized as Indigenous artists connected to their heritage but working in contemporary themes. Their style and use of colour have greatly influenced Hall’s work and served as his inspiration.

The banners are currently on view until Fall 2019 in Vancouver Public Library’s library square promenade. The Chiefs and Nobles is commissioned by City of Vancouver’s Cultural Services and Engineering Services.

Norman (k̕wa̱da) James Hall (b. 1954) is a Nuxalk, Tŝilhqot’in, Heiltsuk, and Kwakwaka’wakw multimedia artist born and raised in Bella Coola, BC who has been living in Vancouver for decades.

Norman’s expertise includes painting, beading, embroidery, carving, and printmaking. His hands are blessed by his Grandmother with matriarchal prayers and strokes of beaver paws. He is a self-taught artist who developed his own techniques. His artistic expressions are influenced by both traditional and contemporary arts.

Norman has been an active artist in the Downtown Eastside community for over ten years. He has participated and showcased his art numerous times in the Downtown Eastside, including Oppenheimer Park Community Art Shows, Downtown Eastside Small Arts Grants Group Shows, National Indigenous Day Art Displays at Carnegie Community Centre Gallery and more.

Just Posted

Province announces $100-million grant funding for Northwest communities

The Northern Capital and Planning Grant will go to four regional districts and 22 municipalities

All Native Basketball Tournament Day 5: Recap

Highlights and results from day 5 at the All Native Tournament

All Native Basketball Tournament Day 6: Preview

Look ahead to all the action scheduled for Feb. 16 at the All Native Tournament

All Native Basketball Tournament Day 4: Recap

Results and highlights from day 4 at the 2019 All Native Basketball Tournament

All Native Basketball Tournament Day 3: Recap

Highlights from around Day 3 of the tournament

B.C. students win Great Waters Challenge video contest

Video, mural and song about saving the salmon claims the top prize

B.C. athlete takes home gold in freestyle aerials at Canada Games

Brayden Kuroda won the event with a combined score of 121.65.

Cabinet likely to extend deadline to reconsider Trans Mountain pipeline

New round of consultations with Indigenous communities is coming

B.C. government provides $75,000 towards salmon study

Study looks at abundance and health of Pacific salmon in Gulf of Alaska

Murdered and missing honoured at Stolen Sisters Memorial March in B.C.

‘We come together to make change within the systems in our society’

UBC researchers develop inexpensive tool to test drinking water

The tricoder can test for biological contamination in real-time

Disgraced ex-Congressman Anthony Weiner released from prison

He was convicted of having illicit online contact with a 15-year-old North Carolina girl in 2017

B.C. communities push back against climate change damages campaign

Activists copying California case that was tossed out of court

Most Read