A seiner with herring in its net. (Ian McAllister)

Historic win for B.C. fishermen now bargaining under labour code

Seine boat fishermen are now their own collective bargaining unit

For the first time in B.C.’s history, those working on commercial fishing boats will be a certified bargaining unit under the labour code.

In October, seine boat fishermen voted on the question of whether or not they wanted the United Fishermen and Workers Union UNIFOR (UFAWU-UNIFOR) to be the collective bargaining agent for all the seine boats that fish for Canadian Fish Company (Canfisco).

However, counting of the ballots was delayed after Canfisco took UFAWU-UNIFOR to court to challenge their bargaining category claiming that “a bargaining unit that includes crew members of seine boats but not gillnet boats is not an appropriate unit for collective bargaining”

READ MORE: B.C. North Coast residents to Ottawa: ‘We can’t make a living fishing’

On June 17, the labour relations board ruled that seine fishers could be their own certified unit and for the ballots to be opened. Nearly 92 per cent of seine fishers voted in favour of getting certified to bargain like any other group of workers.

“This means whatever they want it to mean. Beside collective bargaining for prices, now they have an organization under which to get together to talk to the Department of Fisheries and Oceans. It gives them a chance to speak on issues from management to licensing issues because they are in a bargaining unit,” said Joy Thorkleson, president of UFAWU-UNIFOR.

This will be the very first time those working on fishing boats will become a certified unit, and a collective agreement negotiated, in B.C. under the labour code.

The bargaining unit now includes “all salmon seine boat crew members employed by Canadian Fishing Company including captains/skippers, engineers, mates, cooks, deckhands, and crew members who own the seine boat, and crew members who share ownership of the boat, in the Province of British Columbia”.

READ MORE: Investigating change to B.C.’s fishing licence and quota system

Previously, those working on fishing boats were negotiating with the Canadian Fishing Company under a commercial agreement. They did not have the protection of the rules and regulations from the labour code, meaning companies could have cancelled deals without ramification, explained Thorkleson.

For the past 20 years all gillnetters and seiners negotiated together for an agreement on how much they were going to get paid for fish, but there had been no successful negotiations.

In 1996, the B.C. government put legislation together — the Fishing Collective Bargaining Act — which considered negotiations to be a labour agreement. However, this legislation had never been used before according to Thorkleson.

For a union to collectively bargain for workers, the workers have to have a certification.

Last year, they talked to seine fishermen who said they wanted the union to bargain for them, and signed up a majority of seine workers fishing for the Canadian Fish Company.

Both parties now have 10 days after the votes have been counted to engage in negotiations; they are therefore expected to start in the next couple of days.


Jenna Cocullo | Journalist
Jenna Cocullo 
Send Jenna email
Like the The Northern View on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter

FishFisheries and Oceans CanadafishingUnion wage deals

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

A second wave of COVID-19 is probable, if history tells us anything

B.C.’s top doctor says that what health officials have learned this round will guide response in future

Celebrations continue for Tsilhqot’in Nation after court victory against Taskeo Mines Ltd.

Supreme Court of Canada upholds 2014 decision rejecting New Prosperity mine on May 14, 2020

UPDATE: body of missing man located

Jerret Snow was last seen May 19

Schools preparing for optional part-time classes for students

Parents will have the choice whether or not to return their children to class

LIVE: Procession to honour Snowbirds Capt. Jennifer Casey comes to Halifax

Snowbirds service member died in a crash in Kamloops one week ago

One man dead after standoff with Chilliwack RCMP

The Independent Investigations Office of B.C. is investigating the RCMP’s role in the death

B.C. employers worry about safety, cash flow, second wave in COVID-19 restart

A survey found 75 per cent of businesses worry about attracting customers

Ex-BC Greens leader Andrew Weaver says province came close to early election

Disagreement centred on the LNG Canada project in northern B.C.

Canada’s NHL teams offer options to season-ticket holders

Canadian teams are offering refunds, but also are pushing a number of incentives to let them keep the money

B.C. premier says lessons to learn from past racism during response to pandemic

B.C. formally apologized in the legislature chamber in 2008 for its role in the Komagata Maru tragedy

Snowbirds to remain at Kamloops Airport indefinitely after fatal crash

small contingent of the Snowbirds team is staying in Kamloops, acting as stewards of the jets

Oak Bay man stumbles upon eagle hunting seal, grabs camera just in time

The eagle did ‘a perfect butterfly stroke to shore’ with its prey, photographer says

82% of all test-positive COVID-19 cases in B.C. have recovered

B.C. had 303 active cases as of Saturday, May 23

Most Read