Surrey Bylaw Department is investigating after seven-month-old Odis was mauled to death at Kennedy Park on Monday (June 7, 2021). (Submitted photo)

Family grieving after puppy mauled to death at Surrey park

Surrey Bylaw Department is now investigating

A North Delta family is grieving after their seven-month-old dog, Odis, was mauled to death at a Surrey park.

Manj, who said he didn’t want his last name used, said his wife, Susan, was with their dog at Kennedy Park, located at 12171 90th Ave., on Monday (June 7) around 11:30 a.m. when the incident happened.

He said she was walking Odis when another woman with “two large dogs” came walking down the same trail from the opposite direction.

“Just before you get to the top there’s a large bush on the right-hand side, and her dogs ended up breaking free from her leash that she had them on and she fell down, and that’s when they attacked our dog,” Manj told the Now-Leader.

“When that was going on, my wife was beside herself. The other lady was trying to get our dog away from them and she was screaming something to the effect of, ‘That’s why I can’t bring you guys here,’ something or whatever my wife recalls them saying.”

Manj said the woman got her dogs back, walked down the pathway toward his wife and then continued onto 90th Avenue, heading eastbound.

“Odis never had a chance. He basically died when those dogs attacked him, like there was no chance he could have been saved. His injuries were just far, far (too) severe.” The family got Odis earlier this year.

homelessphoto

Surrey Bylaw Department is investigating after a seven-month-old dog was mauled to death at Kennedy Park on Monday (June 7, 2021). Manj provided this photo of the suspect dogs his wife took after the attack. (Submitted photo)

A few other park users heard the commotion, Manj said, and one came over to call 911 while another followed the woman with the dogs into a residential neighbourhood “not too far away from the Kennedy dog park.”

Surrey RCMP and the city’s bylaw department attended. Surrey RCMP said the investigation has been turned over to animal control.

An emailed statement from the city says it’s an “open investigation,” but there is “no additional information to provide at this time.”

Asked what he hopes will be done, Manj said he just worries this kind of incident could happen again.

“We had to lose our dog. But what happens if it’s a child next time? I don’t think these are the types of dogs that are able to be controlled by the owner. I don’t know if there’s any chance of rehabilitation.”

“I’m not saying that to be spiteful or vengeful. Just based on our experience, I think the best thing is for them to be apprehended and maybe put down. Maybe that’s what’s going to keep everybody safe. Nothing’s going to bring closure to our family.”

But he said he’s grateful to the people who came to help Susan.

“If this happens again, we hope someone else finds the courage to be brave enough to help somebody when they need it most.”



lauren.collins@surreynowleader.com

Like us on Facebook Follow us on Instagram and follow Lauren on Twitter

dog attack

Just Posted

St. Joseph's Mission site is located about six kilometres from Williams Lake First Nation. (Photo submitted)
Williams Lake First Nation planning ground analysis of land near former residential school

St. Joseph’s Mission Indian Residential School operated from 1886 to 1981

People line up to get their COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination centre, Thursday, June 10, 2021 in Montreal. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz
Vaccines, low COVID case counts increase Father’s Day hope, but risk is still there

Expert says people will have to do their own risk calculus before popping in on Papa

FILE – A science class at L.A. Matheson Secondary in Surrey, B.C. on March 12, 2021. (Lauren Collins/Surrey Now Leader)
Teachers’ union wants more COVID transmission data as B.C. prepares for back-to-school

BCTF says that details will be important as province works on plan for September

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry outlines B.C.’s COVID-19 restart plan, May 25, 2021, including larger gatherings and a possible easing of mandatory masks on July 1. (B.C. government photo)
B.C. records 120 new COVID-19 cases, second vaccines accelerating

Lower Pfizer deliveries for early July, Moderna shipments up

A Heffley Creek peacock caught not one - but two - lifts on a logging truck this month. (Photo submitted)
Heffley Creek-area peacock hops logging trucks in search of love

Peacock hitched two lifts in the past month

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

The Calgary skyline is seen on Friday, Sept. 15, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
2 deaths from COVID-19 Delta variant in Alberta, 1 patient was fully immunized

Kerry Williamson with Alberta Health Services says the patients likely acquired the virus in the hospital

The first suspension bridge is the tallest in Canada, with a second suspension bridge just below it. The two are connected by a trail that’s just over 1 km. (Claire Palmer photo)
PHOTOS: The highest suspension bridges in Canada just opened in B.C.

The Skybridge in Golden allows visitors to take in views standing at 130 and 80 metres

BC Green Party leader and Cowichan Valley MLA Sonia Furstenau introduced a petition to the provincial legislature on Thursday calling for the end of old-growth logging in the province. (File photo)
BC Green leader Furstenau introduces old-growth logging petition

Party calls for the end of old-growth logging as protests in Fairy Creek continue

B.C. Premier John Horgan leaves his office for a news conference in the legislature rose garden, June 3, 2020. (B.C. government photo)
B.C. premier roasted for office budget, taxing COVID-19 benefits

Youth addiction law that triggered election hasn’t appeared

Most Read