Ex-health official sentenced to house arrest

Former Fraser Health technology manager James Roy Taylor was charged in 2010 along with an Abbotsford doctor and a former senior official in the B.C. health ministry, after police found evidence of improper payments and benefits in health ministry purchasing.

James Roy Taylor was network manager for Fraser Health.

VICTORIA – A former Fraser Health technology manager has been handed a one-year conditional sentence and a year’s probation for improperly accepting benefits from a contractor supplying electronic health care systems to hospitals.

James Roy Taylor, 64, was charged in 2010 along with an Abbotsford doctor and a former senior official in the B.C. health ministry. Taylor pleaded guilty Tuesday in Victoria provincial court to one count of breach of trust, and three other charges were withdrawn.

Special prosecutor John Waddell recommended the sentence, which begins with six months of house arrest, where Taylor will only be allowed to leave his South Surrey home between 6 a.m. and 9 p.m. for work or other activities approved by his probation supervisor.

Taylor was also fined $2,000, the value of a stay at a Kelowna condominium he accepted as a benefit without telling his supervisors.He must also perform 175 hours of community service.

Waddell said the house arrest conditions are more severe than others charged in the case because Taylor has a previous conviction for fraud, related to the disappearance of $66,000 from the White Rock Sea Festival Society when Taylor was its president in 1998.

Ron Danderfer, former assistant deputy minister of health responsible for technology, also pleaded guilty in July to one charge of breach of trust. Danderfer and Taylor both admitted accepting a benefit from Jonathan Burns, the Abbotsford doctor who pleaded guilty in February to two charges in the case.

All were originally charged with multiple counts, including fraud on government and breach of trust by a public official.

When charges were revealed in March 2010, prosecutors accused Burns of offering Danderfer and Taylor accommodation at a Kelowna condominium, employment income for relatives and “post-retirement income” in exchange for using their positions to give contracts to Burns and his company WebMed Technology Inc.

Burns was sentenced to three years probation and 100 hours of community service, providing free health care to the needy. Danderfer was put on probation for two years, plus community service and a fine of $3,690, the value of two stays at the Kelowna condo.

In search warrant documents filed in 2009, RCMP commercial crime investigators alleged that WebMed “fraudulently submitted 30 invoices totaling $251,348.40 that Jim Taylor fraudulently authorized.”

Burns hired Taylor’s wife, a nurse, to work for WebMed when the company’s digital diagnosis system was being tested in Chilliwack and Maple Ridge hospitals.

In applications for search warrants, RCMP said Burns also offered to pay for side trips to Paris and Egypt while Burns and Danderfer were on government business in Europe.

Just Posted

Tommy Chong says cannabis legalization makes him proud to be a Canadian

Legendary marijuana advocate and comedian celebrates cultural milestone at Kelowna event

Ocean “Blob” returns to North Coast of B.C.

A 2,000 kilometre patch of warm ocean water could signal a warm winter in Prince Rupert

‘Police are ready’ for legal pot, say Canadian chiefs

But Canadians won’t see major policing changes as pot becomes legal

VIDEO: This is what buying legal pot in B.C. looks like

Take a look inside B.C.’s first and only legal pot shop located in Kamloops

10 things still illegal in the new age of recreational cannabis

Pot is legal – but there are still a lot of rules, and breaking some could leave you in jail

Singer k.d. lang receives Alberta’s highest honour

Celebrated singer-songwriter k.d. lang received the Alberta Order of Excellence in Edmonton

‘Mom, I’m in trouble:’ Canadian faces 10 years for alleged graffiti

Brittney Schneider, another tourist caught spraying message on walls of Tha Pae Gate in Thailand

Feds consulting on national anti-racism strategy behind closed doors

Heritage Minister Pablo Rodriguez says people still face systemic racism in some communities

Enbridge aims for mid-November to finish B.C. pipeline repair after blast

A natural gas pipeline that ruptured and burned near Prince George caused an explosion and fireball

How to get government cheques if Canada Post staff go on strike

The Canadian Union of Postal Workers said members could go on rotating strikes as early as Monday

Anti-SOGI school trustee files defamation lawsuit against BCTF president

Barry Neufeld says Glen Hansman’s words caused him “indignity,” “personal harassment,” and “anxiety”

Pot sales down by nearly 70% on Day 2 of legalization in B.C.

Several products on BC Cannabis Store are still sold out

B.C. jury finds man guilty of Japanese exchange student’s murder

Natsumi Kogawa was found at empty heritage mansion shortly after she was reported missing in 2016

Most Read