Former Burns Lake mayor Luke Strimbold is facing multiple sex related charges. (File photo)

Disturbing details emerge in former Burns Lake mayor’s sexual assault trial

Six male teens are accusing Luke Strimbold of sex related crimes

[Please be advised this article contains descriptions of sexual assault involving minors.]

Disturbing details in a former Burns Lake mayor’s sexual assault trial were laid out in a Smithers courtroom Tuesday.

Luke Strimbold is facing 11 counts of sexual assault, 11 counts of sexual inference and seven counts of invitation to sexual touching.

The charges relate to six male teens who were between the ages of 13 and 15 at the time of the alleged assaults.

The teens have accused Strimbold of fondling their genitals, performing and receiving oral sex and anal penetration.

READ MORE: Former Burns Lake mayor facing sex charges involving minors during time in office

At B.C. Supreme Court in Smithers Tuesday, special prosecutor Leonard Doust told the court in nearly every case the assaults allegedly occurred after a night of drinking.

The boys were heavily intoxicated after drinking alcohol Strimbold allegedly provided, Doust said in court.

Strimbold is accused of initiating the assaults while the complainants were asleep, Doust said.

In some cases the complainants said they woke up to find the Strimbold groping them or performing fellatio, Doust told the court.

In one instance the alleged assault escalated to anal penetration, Doust said.

These assaults are alleged to have taken place over a seven year period between 2010-2017.

Strimbold served as Burns Lake mayor from 2011 to 2016.

“The allegations here are suggestive of a repeated, consistent pattern of behaviour,” Doust said in court.

“The accused exploits situations in which adolescent boys are heavily intoxicated, isolated from other adults and highly vulnerable.”

READ MORE: Burns Lake reeling after allegations of sexual assault against former mayor

Strimbold had turned himself in on Tuesday morning, spurring on the need for new bail orders as an Aug. 9 indictment contained different charges than at the time of Strimbold’s initial arrest.

Crown wanted to raise the fine for breaking bail conditions from $2500 to $50,000; the imposition of a surety; and for Strimbold to surrender his passport.

A surety is someone who promises to supervise and be responsible for a person accused of crime while on bail. If the accused breaks their bail conditions the accused and surety will have to pay a fine. In this case it will be $50,000.

The court ruled in favour of the Crown’s suggested alternations to Strimbold’s bail conditions during a hearing in relation to charges from an Aug. 9 indictment.

READ MORE: Former Burns Lake mayor faces 10 new sex-related charges

READ MORE: Former Burns Lake mayor trial pushed back as more accusers surface

Crown argued a surety is necessary to ensure Strimbold does not “continue to create or participate in situations that mirror those of the alleged offences.”

Crown also argued that Strimbold was a flight risk and thus needed to surrender his passport.

Defence asked Crown if they would consent to Strimbold taking a trip to Australia later this month.

Crown did not consent and asserted that the fact Strimbold could afford to take such a trip shows he has the financial means to leave at any time he wishes.

The defence said Strimbold simply wanted to know if it was possible to leave the jurisdiction at some point for a vacation.

He had no intention of subverting the court order, defence said.

If Strimbold is found guilty of these crimes he could face a lot of years in prison which only increases his flight risk, Crown told the court.

“There’s nothing to suggest the [Strimbold’s] propensity to carry out these types of assaults has abated in any way,” Doust said in court.

The defence argued the Crown’s additional conditions were unnecessary as Strimbold has proven he is able meet the court’s bail conditions and has not been accused of any new crimes since being on bail.

The additional charges are alleged to have taken place before Strimbold was arrested earlier this year.

Strimbold, the defence said, has not shown not broken or shown any risk of breaking bails conditions since being released in February.

The defence said Strimbold is currently living and working with father who owns a construction company and has many other family ties to the area. This binds him to the community which lessens his flight risk the defence said.

Members of Strimbold’s family were in court to show their support.

Strimbold had voluntarily surrendered to the RCMP Tuesday morning when his arrest warrant went into effect which shows his willingness to obey court orders the defence said.

The court ultimately sided with the Crown as Strimbold is facing more serious charges which could result in more jail time, leading to a higher chance he may flee.

The court also agreed with the Crown’s assertion that these allegations show a consistent pattern of behaviour as they supposedly occurred over a number of year.

An increase in the number of complainants from four to six also swayed the court to the Crown’s side.

Strimbold has been ordered to surrender his passport on or before Oct. 4 at 5 p.m. to RCMP or his bail supervisor.

Strimbold’s next court appearance will be in Smithers on Oct. 29.

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Central Coast Regional District swears in new Board of Directors

There are three new faces representing our region and two returning directors

VIDEO: Black horse signals ‘sign of peace’ for Tsilhqot’in Nation

Justin Trudeau rides black horse provided by Cooper family

Trudeau exonerates hanged war chiefs of 1864 on B.C. Tsilhqot’in title lands

Prime minister rides horseback with Chief Joe Alphonse, TNG Chairman, to Xeni Gwet’in meeting place

B.C. Legions in need of young members to continue aiding veterans into the future

Lest we forget what thousands of men and women did to fight for Canada’s freedoms – but without new membership, many Legion chapters face dwindling numbers

Rain, snowfall warnings in effect across B.C.

B.C.’s Interior set to get hit with snow while the Lower Mainland is expected to see more rain

People flocking to Vancouver Island city to see hundreds of sea lions

Each year the combination of Steller and California sea lions take over Cowichan Bay

Baloney Meter: Will tougher penalties for gang members make Canada safer?

Since 2013, gang-related homicides in Canada’s largest cities have almost doubled

Early data suggests no spike in pot-impaired driving after legalization: police

Some departments said it’s too early to provide data, others said initial numbers suggest stoned driving isn’t on the rise

Protesters confront Environment Minister in B.C.

Protesters wanting more for killer whales confront Catherine McKenna

Humans reshaping evolutionary history of species around the globe: paper

University of British Columbia researcher had the paper published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society

Toronto ‘carding’ activist Desmond Cole stopped by police in Vancouver

Cole says his experience reveals what daily life is like for black and Indigenous residents

Commercial trucks banned from left lane of Coquihalla

B.C.’s Ministry of Transportation has introduced a new program that hopes to prevent accidents and closures on the Coquihalla Highway.

B.C. on track to record same number of overdose deaths as last year

128 people died of overdoses in September, bringing the total to more than 1,100 so far in 2018

B.C. firefighters rescue horse stuck in mud

‘It happens more often than you’d think,’ says deputy chief

Most Read