Will and Kate were 'white hatted' during their stop in Calgary several years ago. Cultural celebrations are being planned by the Heiltsuk Nation in Bella Bella.

Details released for Royal Tour’s stop in Bella Bella

Will and Kate’s tour of Bella Bella is sure to be a show stopper

Will and Kate’s tour of Bella Bella is sure to be a show stopper, with details released this week on how the couple plans to spend their time there.

The stop will begin with an aerial tour of the Great Bear Rainforest, followed by a First Nations Welcome where their Royal Highnesses are welcomed by the Heiltsuk community in a traditional ceremony. This will be followed by a Cultural Sharing Ceremony.

Also on the agenda is a Dedication of the Great Bear Rainforest. Their Royal Highnesses walk to the Elders Lodge, where The Duke of Cambridge will mark the dedication of the Great Bear Rainforest as part of the Queen’s Commonwealth Canopy initiative.

The Queen’s Commonwealth Canopy (QCC), was conceived by the Right Honourable Frank Field MP, was launched at the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in Malta, in 2015. The QCC is a unique network of forest conservation initiatives, which involves all 53 countries of the Commonwealth.

The QCC presents “a rare opportunity to unite the whole Commonwealth family and save one of the world’s most important natural habitats – forests. By creating a pan-Commonwealth network of forest conservation projects, the QCC will mark Her Majesty The Queen’s service to the Commonwealth while conserving indigenous forests for future generations.”

It has been confirmed that the Royal couple’s children, Prince George and Princess Charlotte, will be joining them on the tour but it is believed they will be based in Victoria and unlikely to make an appearance in Bella Bella.

The CBC published an article on “royal etiquette” which outlines proper protocol for the Royal visit. Selfies are “not possible” according to the Department of Canadian Heritage. Apparently Her Majesty the Queen is not a fan of the selfie craze, but the Canadian government says that’s not the reason the informal pictures won’t be allowed. They just take too much time.

“To ensure the Duke and Duchess have the opportunity to meet with as many Canadians as possible, it is not possible to take selfies with them,” said the Department of Canadian Heritage in a statement.

Beyond the selfie rules, the heritage department has issued guidelines for people meeting the royal family — covering everything from curtseys and toasts to hats and gloves.

These are not inflexible dictums, just tips to make people “feel comfortable and prepared,” the site notes.

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