The CFN's unique offer is getting provincial attention

Coastal First Nations offer grizzly watching tour in exchange for LEH grizzly tag

Coastal First Nations offer grizzly watching tour in exchange for LEH grizzly tag

Professional bear guides from British Columbia’s Coastal First Nations are inviting a pair of lucky hunters to come shoot bears in the Great Bear Rainforest – using cameras instead of guns.

Spirit Bear Lodge, a First Nations-owned and operated facility, is offering an all-expenses-paid bear viewing experience in exchange for a Limited Entry Hunt authorization for grizzly bear within Coastal First Nations territories. The winner will be selected in a random draw, with additional prizes for runners-up.

The grand prize includes round-trip airfare for two, five nights’ deluxe island accommodation, and daily adventures deep into grizzly country with experienced professional guides. Guests will learn more about First Nations culture, wildlife science – and the vibrant new economy emerging on the coast.

“It’s a fact that bears are worth more alive than they are dead,” said Kitasoo/Xai’xais Stewardship Director and Spirit Bear Lodge guide Douglas Neasloss. “You don’t have to harvest a resource to get value from a resource. Bears bring huge value to coastal ecosystems, and to my community in terms of a sustainable economy.”

Spirit Bear Lodge employs 40 people in the remote community of Klemtu. Overall, bear viewing in the Great Bear Rainforest pumps 12 times more money into the province’s economy than bear hunting. In fact, Stanford University researchers concluded the coastal bear hunt actually loses taxpayers money.

Coastal First Nations is an alliance of First Nations on British Columbia’s North and Central Coast and Haida Gwaii. In 2012, CFN member nations issued a formal ban on trophy hunting for bears within their territories. The Province of British Columbia continues to issue kill authorizations in defiance of tribal law – and majority opposition by hunters.

“Like most hunters in B.C., I hunt to feed my family,” said Heiltsuk Coastwatch Director William Housty. “Whether you’re First Nations or not, it’s against our common values to kill animals for fun. If anyone’s still not convinced, I encourage them to leave their guns and come see these beautiful coastal grizzlies from our perspective.”

The prize offer applies to LEH hunt numbers 3005, 3006, 3007, 3008, 3128, 3129, 3130, or 3131, covering regions 5-08 and 5-09. Anyone holding a valid authorization is encouraged to contact Spirit Bear Lodge. This year’s LEH deadline is May 23. The trip would take place in September.

 

Just Posted

Province announces $100-million grant funding for Northwest communities

The Northern Capital and Planning Grant will go to four regional districts and 22 municipalities

All Native Basketball Tournament Day 5: Recap

Highlights and results from day 5 at the All Native Tournament

All Native Basketball Tournament Day 6: Preview

Look ahead to all the action scheduled for Feb. 16 at the All Native Tournament

All Native Basketball Tournament Day 4: Recap

Results and highlights from day 4 at the 2019 All Native Basketball Tournament

All Native Basketball Tournament Day 3: Recap

Highlights from around Day 3 of the tournament

B.C. students win Great Waters Challenge video contest

Video, mural and song about saving the salmon claims the top prize

B.C. athlete takes home gold in freestyle aerials at Canada Games

Brayden Kuroda won the event with a combined score of 121.65.

Cabinet likely to extend deadline to reconsider Trans Mountain pipeline

New round of consultations with Indigenous communities is coming

B.C. government provides $75,000 towards salmon study

Study looks at abundance and health of Pacific salmon in Gulf of Alaska

Murdered and missing honoured at Stolen Sisters Memorial March in B.C.

‘We come together to make change within the systems in our society’

UBC researchers develop inexpensive tool to test drinking water

The tricoder can test for biological contamination in real-time

Disgraced ex-Congressman Anthony Weiner released from prison

He was convicted of having illicit online contact with a 15-year-old North Carolina girl in 2017

B.C. communities push back against climate change damages campaign

Activists copying California case that was tossed out of court

Most Read