Dr. Sean Cambridge and Dr. Rosemarie Cambridge are no longer permitted to run their medical practice in Chilliwack after failing to pass the board exam five and four times respectively over six years. (Chilliwack Division of Family Practice)

B.C. doctor reprimanded for lying to College of Physicians and Surgeons

Dr. Sean Cambridge no longer allowed to practise after failing board exams five times in six years

A Chilliwack doctor who lost his licence to practice medicine in B.C. in 2017 for repeatedly failing the qualifying exam has been formally reprimanded by the College of Physicians and Surgeons of B.C. (the College).

Dr. Sean Liam Oscar Christopher Cambridge and his wife Dr. Rosemarie Trellis Penelope Cambridge, a married couple, were granted provisional licences to practise medicine in B.C. in 2011, the two taking on a large practice in the city, which faces a shortage of family doctors.

Now more than 1,000 patients are left without a family doctor after the pair repeatedly failed to pass the licensing exam.

But it was Sean Cambridge’s failure to disclose the fact that he had his licence revoked in Saskatchewan that led to the College reprimand this week, which comes with a $5,000 fine, and a number of other conditions.

In a press release issued April 18, the College said Cambridge “admitted to engaging in unprofessional conduct by making a material misrepresentation on his application for registration to the College.”

Specifically, he did not tell the College that he was at one time registered with the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Saskatchewan (CPSS) and that licence was terminated.

He answered in the negative to this question: “Have you ever had your licence to practise medicine in any jurisdiction revoked, suspended, or restricted in any way?”

After six years of practising medicine in Chilliwack, and failing to pass the board exams five times in six years – Rosemarie Cambridge failed four times in six years – the couple’s registration with the College was cancelled on Sept. 12, 2017.

The Cambridges’ lawyer told the CBC’s Eric Rankin that the had 1,180 patients in the last full year of their practice. Those patients are now without a family doctor, but a reliable source has told The Progress the number of patients under their care was actually much higher than that.

And while he was on a provisional licence that sets limits on the practice, according to the Ministry of Health’s public records, Sean Cambridge billed just an average of $557,130 for the five fiscal years between 2012/2013 and 2016/2017, considerably higher than the provincial average.

This week it was announced Sean Cambridge consented to the disposition by the College, which includes: a formal reprimand; notification to the College of the location of his patient records; payment to the college of $5,000; a note if he is ever registered again that he is in the “Conditional – Disciplined” class; and that if he re-applies to the College he must attend and complete a multi-disciplinary assessment program, participate in continuing medical education with a focus on ethics and professionalism, and attend an interview at the College.

And while the formal reprimand issued this week could spell the end of his career in medicine in Chilliwack and B.C., it may not as he could eventually pass the exam and re-apply. Many patients, however, have expressed real dissatisfaction with the Cambridges’ practice repeatedly over the years.

From misdiagnoses to overlooked test results to bad bedside manner, patients have anecdotally expressed a number of concerns about the Cambridges to The Progress.

See more on this story next week in print and at www.theprogress.com.

• RELATED: Free agency of doctors could be curbed with parameters, says Chilliwack-Kent MLA


@PeeJayAitch
paul.henderson@theprogress.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

B.C. BUDGET: Surplus $374 million after bailouts of BC Hydro, ICBC

Growth projected stronger in 2020, Finance Minister Carole James says

First residents move into Nuxalk Nation’s tiny homes

Four of the tiny homes are now complete and residents have moved in

Province announces $100-million grant funding for Northwest communities

The Northern Capital and Planning Grant will go to four regional districts and 22 municipalities

All Native Basketball Tournament Day 5: Recap

Highlights and results from day 5 at the All Native Tournament

Students give two thumbs up to no more B.C. student loan interest

Eliminating the loan interest charges could save the average graduate $2,300 over 10 years

Ontario man accused of killing 11-year-old daughter dies in hospital, police say

Roopesh Rajkumar had been hospitalized with what police described as a self-inflicted gunshot wound

Manitoba ‘pauses’ link with ex-B.C. premier Gordon Campbell after allegations

Campbell had been hired to review two major hydro projects

Heritage minute features Japanese-Canadian baseball team, internment

The Vancouver Asahi baseball team won various championships across the Pacific Northwest

UPDATE: Woman, off-duty cop in critical condition after stabbing outside B.C. elementary school

The officer was interceding in an alleged assault when he and the woman were stabbed

$10-a-day child care not in 2019 budget, but advocate not irked

Sharon Gregson with the Coalition of Child Care Advocates of B.C. says NDP on track to deliver promise

B.C. Seniors Advocate questions labour shortage in care homes

Are there really no workers, or are care aide wages too low?

B.C. business groups worry about looming economic decline in wake of NDP budget

The party’s second government budget focused on plenty of spending, business advocates say

Man injured in police shooting near Nelson has died: B.C. police watchdog

The death follows an incident in Bonnington on Feb. 13

Most Read