FILE - In this Oct. 8, 2012, file photo, a salesperson stands at counters selling mobile phones produced by ZTE Corp. at an appliance store in Wuhan in central China’s Hubei province. (Chinatopix Via AP, File)

Canada says it won’t be deterred by Chinese pressure

The U.S., Australia, Japan and other governments have imposed curbs on use of 5G technology

Canada’s public safety minister said Friday that the country won’t be deterred by Chinese pressure after China threatened reprisals if Huawei was banned from supplying equipment for 5G networks, highlighting the growing rift between America’s neighbour and the global super power.

There are accusations that the telecom giant is controlled by China’s ruling Communist Party or is required to facilitate Chinese spying. The U.S., Australia, Japan and other governments have imposed curbs on use of its technology.

Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale said Canada has been abundantly clear it will not compromise national security.

“It’s a difficult challenge but we’ll not be deterred by what we believe to be right and what we believe to be in the interests of Canada,” Goodale said.

Lu Shaye, China’s ambassador to Canada, warned Thursday of repercussions if Canada bars the firm from its new 5G network.

READ MORE: Huawei founder thanks inmates, Canadian justice system for treating daughter well

Canada and its security agencies are studying whether to use equipment from Huawei as phone carriers prepare to roll out fifth-generation technology.

5G is designed to support a vast expansion of networks to facilitate medical devices, self-driving cars and other technology. That increases the risk of potential security failures and has prompted governments to treat telecom communications networks as strategic assets.

But the arrest of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou in Canada on Dec. 1 at the request of the United States has created a growing diplomatic rift between China and Canada. Meng is the chief financial officer of Huawei and the daughter of its founder.

The U.S. wants her extradited to face charges that she committed fraud by misleading banks about Huawei’s business dealings in Iran.

China detained former Canadian diplomat Michael Kovrig and Canadian entrepreneur Michael Spavor 10 days after Meng’s arrest on allegations that they were “engaging in activities that endanger the national security” of China in an apparent attempt to pressure Canada to release her. China also sentenced another Canadian, Robert Schellenberg, to death Monday in a sudden retrial of his drug-smuggling case.

Meng is now out on bail in Canada and is awaiting extradition proceedings. A hearing is scheduled for next month.

On Thursday, Lu warned Canadian Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland not to use next week’s World Economic Forum meeting in Davos, Switzerland, to press for support against China. He also said Canada’s arrest of Meng was an act of “backstabbing” by Canada and called it “politically motivated.”

Freeland has said the detention of two Canadians will be at the top of her agenda in Davos and didn’t back down from her position after hearing about the ambassador’s remark.

Canada maintains Meng’s arrest is a matter of rule of law and says it is acting according to its international treaty obligations.

“We are nation that stands on the basis of the rule of law, stands on the basis of the principles that we fight for and work for around the world,” Goodale said.

Huawei’s image suffered a new blow last week when Polish authorities announced that a Chinese employee was arrested on spying charges. Huawei said it fired the employee and the allegations were unrelated to the company.

Rob Gillies, The Associated Press

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