B.C. cities want to install their own photo radar

NDP government has refused to introduce the practice that aims to reduce speeding drivers

Local governments have voted to ask the province to let them install their own photo radar.

Delegates at this year’s Union of B.C. Municipalities convention carried a resolution on Thursday asking the government to change rules to allow cities to install photo radar on local roads at the local government’s expense.

The issue came up at a West Kelowna council meeting in June, where Coun. Rick de Jong said he “would welcome back photo radar.”

It remained a controversial decision for UBCM delegates, passing with only 60 per cent.

Photo radar has been debated as a solution to reduce crashes. A report on ICBC released in July recommended photo radar as one option to reduce speeding, saying the research points to at least a 14-per-cent reduction in collisions.

The province installed cameras at intersections in 1999 as part of the BC Intersection Safety Camera program. However, these cameras are not used for speed enforcement, despite a 2011-2012 analysis of speeds at 140 intersections that found 10 per cent of vehicles were going at least 40 km/hr over the speed limit.

In response to the July report, Attorney General David Eby, who is the NDP government’s ICBC minister and past critic, called photo radar a “non-starter,” as it has been so unpopular with voters, but declined to provide more information.

READ: ICBC rates could go up 30 per cent by 2019: report

Instead, Eby said the government would find a way to make bad drivers pay more. He said a predicted 30-per-cent rise in premiums by 2019 would not happen under the NDP’s watch.

The report had said accident rates went up by 23 per cent between 2013 and 2016, and that vehicle repair costs skyrocketed to a total of $1.5 billion in 2016.

Provincial budget documents revealed this winter that the auto ensurer is expected to run a $833-million deficit by the end of 2017.


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

IT’S OFFICIAL: Mt. Timothy sale complete

New owners looking toward year-round mountain resort facility

B.C. First Nations’ intake of essential nutrients to drop by 31 per cent: study

Professors project the nutrient decrease by 2050 if climate change mitigation continues as is

Bella Coola Harbour to receive federal funding

The amount of funding has not been announced yet

WANTED: Five sought by RCMP

Police asking for public’s assistance finding five people on outstanding warrants.

Carey Price breaks Canadiens goalie record with 315 wins

Habs netminder surpasses Jacques Plante’s record for most wins

VIDEO: RCMP ask kids to help name soon-to-be police dogs

13 German shepherd puppies will be born this year

‘The whole city has changed:’ B.C. woman in New Zealand reacts to mosque attacks

An expatriate and Muslim students at UBC Okanagan deeply affected by white supremacist shooting

Trudeau condemns hateful, ‘toxic segments’ of society after New Zealand shooting

Prime Minister expressed sorrow at the many attacks in recent years

Air Canada grounds its Boeing Max 8s until at least July 1 to provide certainty

Airlines around the world have been working to redeploy their fleets since their Max 8s were grounded last week

Budget to tout Liberal economic record, provide distraction from SNC furor

This is the Liberal government’s fourth and final budget before the election

Horvat scores 16 seconds into OT as Canucks beat Blackhawks 3-2

Pettersson sets rookie scoring record for Vancouver

Vancouver Island overdue for the big one, can also expect mega-thrust tsunami

The last big earthquake was 70 years ago in Courtenay

No injuries, pollution in Vancouver Harbour ship collision: Transport Canada

Transportation Safety Board says it has deployed a team of investigators look into the incident

Budget 2019: Five things to watch for in the Liberals’ final fiscal blueprint

Finance Minister Bill Morneau will release the Trudeau government’s final budget on Tuesday

Most Read