The upper age limit for young adults who were formerly in care and want to apply for the provincial tuition waiver program has been raised to 27 years old. (Wikimedia Commons)

B.C. boosts support for former youth in government care

More support coming for rent, child care and health care while they go back to school

The B.C. government says it’s giving a financial break to young adults who have spent time in government care.

Those young adults will now get more support for rent, child care and health care, while they go back to school or attend a rehabilitation, vocational or approved life skills program.

READ MORE: VIU tuition waiver program targets youth in care

READ MORE: The tragic and preventable death of a teen in government care

The changes come as part of a $7.7-million expansion of the Agreements with Young Adults program and they take effect April 1.

As part of the expansion, the upper age limit for young adults who want to apply for the provincial tuition waiver program has been raised to 27 years old.

The needs-based monthly support rate has also been raised by up to $250 to a new maximum of $1,250.

The provincial government says financial support is now available year round, instead of the previous eight-month limit, so young people can continue to receive supports while on summer holiday or other program breaks.

The Canadian Press

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