Displaying their Moose Hide Campaign pins in the photo are Spencer Hammond, aboriginal connect coordinator and Bev Best, manager aboriginal student engagement. (UNBC photo)

‘A long way to go’: UNBC hosts Moose Hide Campaign gathering on Feb. 24

The event is a part of a movement to stand up against violence inflicted on women and children

There is a grassroots movement of indigenous and non-indigenous men and boys who are standing up against violence towards women and children.

The Moose Hide Campaign which unites people to take a stance against violence towards women is holding a regional gathering in Prince George on Feb. 24. The provincial Moose Hide Campaign Gathering takes place in Victoria.

The University of Northern British Columbia is partnering with Lheidli T’enneh Nation, the College of New Caledonia, Prince George Native Friendship Centre and the provincial Ministry of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation.

The event on Monday will be held at the university, friendship centre and the College of New Caledonia, stated a Feb. 18 news release.

At UNBC, there will a full day of talks, interactive sessions and displays as part of the Prince George Regional Moose Hide Campaign Gathering.

The first keynote address will be given by Bruce Allan, an educator from the Ts’umusyoo (Bear Clan) of the Stellat’en First Nation. His speech will include his experiences with adverse childhood experiences and his healing journey.

Other speakers include — Francois ‘Guy’ Prince who is a member of the Beaver Clan from Nak’azdli First Nation and Ruby Prince, a member of the Frog clan with the Tl’azt’en First Nation.

“They will speak about the roles and responsibilities based on the cultural teachings of the Dakelhne,” the release stated.

Additionally, there will be sessions on storytelling, inter-generational trauma, impacts of colonization, and a number of talking circles.

UNBC acting president Dr. Geoffrey Payne said the university is committed to providing a safe and positive learning environment for all students, faculty, staff and visitors to their campuses.

“The Moose Hide Campaign is an important reminder that we still have a long way to go to eliminate gender-based violence in our society,” Payne said.

Supporting the campaign and working towards ending said violence against women and children is “an essential part of the ongoing conversation we are having at UNBC about reconciliation,” he said.

The full agenda for the day is available online and those interested in participating should register in advance, stated the release.

Furthermore, participants are encouraged to wear a moose hide pin, which signifies “commitment to honour, respect and to protect the women and children in your life and to work together to end violence against women and children.”

Supporters are also being encouraged to fast from sunrise to sunset as a public demonstration of one’s values and intentions.

READ MORE: UNBC professor receives funding to research oilspill response

READ MORE: Province’s $6.5M will help women escape violence, Public Safety Minister announces


Aman Parhar
Editor, Vanderhoof Omineca Express

aman.parhar@ominecaexpress.com

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