39% of pot users say they drive after smoking: Health Canada survey

About 40 per cent of pot users, aged 20-24 years old, admit to driving within 2 hours of getting high

As the province grapples with how it’ll monitor and enforce safe driving once marijuana is legalized next year, a Health Canada survey suggests police will have their hands full.

In the national survey that included roughly 9,200 responses, 39 per cent of the 2,600 who admitted to smoking pot said they’ve driven within two hours of getting high.

By age group, 43 per cent of self-reported pot users aged 20 to 24 years admitted to driving under the influence of cannabis within two hours of smoking the substance. About 28 per cent of those aged 16 to 19 also said they’d gotten behind the wheel.

Respondents were also asked for their opinions on how cannabis use affects driving.

WATCH: Liberals said they’d develop own regulations on driving while high

WATCH: Province, Feds see lots of work ahead of marijuana legalization

About 75 per cent of all respondents reported that they think that cannabis use affects driving, while 19 per cent of pot users said it did not affect driving.

When asked how long a person should wait before driving, approximately 35 per cent of respondents said “it depends” followed by “don’t know” (23.5 per cent).

While the survey was conducted last spring, its release comes at the same time as the Senate considers proposed legislation that would help police forces at provincial and municipal levels deal with drug-impaired drivers.

Under Bill C-46, people found to have two nanograms of THC – the psychoactive ingredient found in cannabis – per millilitre of blood within two hours of driving could be fined up to $1,000.

Meanwhile, drivers with more than five nanograms could face up to 10 years in jail.

In B.C., the government has put a hold on its own legislation for driving under the influence of cannabis, awaiting what is finalized at a federal level before July 2018.


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

VIDEO: Black horse signals ‘sign of peace’ for Tsilhqot’in Nation

Justin Trudeau rides black horse provided by Cooper family

Trudeau exonerates hanged war chiefs of 1864 on B.C. Tsilhqot’in title lands

Prime minister rides horseback with Chief Joe Alphonse, TNG Chairman, to Xeni Gwet’in meeting place

B.C. Legions in need of young members to continue aiding veterans into the future

Lest we forget what thousands of men and women did to fight for Canada’s freedoms – but without new membership, many Legion chapters face dwindling numbers

Rain, snowfall warnings in effect across B.C.

B.C.’s Interior set to get hit with snow while the Lower Mainland is expected to see more rain

Turn your clocks back: Daylight Saving time ends Sunday

Don’t forget to turn back your clock, change your batteries

VIDEO: Amazon to split second HQ between New York, Virginia

Official decision expected later Tuesday to end competition between North American cities to win bid and its promise of 50,000 jobs

Disabled boy has ‘forgiven’ bullies who walked on him in stream, mom says

A Cape Breton teen who has cerebral palsy was told to lie in a stream as other kids walked over him

Letters shed light on state of mind of B.C. mom accused of daughter’s murder

Trial of South Surrey mother Lisa Batstone begins in BC Supreme Court

Vancouver man must pay $22,000 after breaking strata rules

Peter Gordon took his fight over his rented condo to the civil resolution tribunal, but lost

B.C. cheese linked to 5 E. coli cases

People are asked to throw out or return ‘Qualicum Spice’ cheese

Canada Post no longer guarantees delivery times amid more rotating strikes

The Canadian Union of Postal Workers closed two major processing centres in Ontario and B.C.

B.C. city councillor resigns as AutismBC director amid SOGI controversy

AutismBC president Gary Robins says Laurie Guerra’s resignation is effective Nov. 12

McGill students vote overwhelmingly to change Redmen team nickname

Student union held a referendum after a campaign by Indigenous students

B.C. university pride group replaces white supremacy posters

Around 50 people walked through downtown Victoria to share posters of love

Most Read