Parents Ashley Brown and Nelson Siwallace

Bella Coola Hospital purchases brand new crib with donated funds

Kyson Siwallace is being honoured with a photo in his memory, which will be hung in the hospital corridor.

Just over a year ago Ashley Brown and Nelson Siwallace lost their first-born son, Kyson Bryan Levi Siwallace. Born with a rare disorder, Kyson passed away at 27 months. Driven by the desire to help other families facing similar struggles, Ashley and Nelson organized a fundraiser in their son’s memory. Thanks to donations from local businesses and community members, it raised over $4000.

“The hospital was really touched by this, and we very much appreciated this gesture,” said Suezie Koury, Director of Care. “It’s really amazing how this family, and community, has raised such a substantial amount of money for other kids with special needs.”

The fundraiser brought to the forefront the challenges of caring for special needs children, especially when living in a remote location. Families often have to travel repeatedly for medical and the strain can be enormous. More local resources can be a huge relief for those struggling with the day-to-day requirements of special needs children.

The hospital purchased several items with the money, with the most substantial item just being delivered last month: a brand new ‘Stryker’ crib. Built with multiple special features, the crib allows caregivers easier access to babies when they are in care. With a price tag of over $10,000, the donations were a huge help in the purchase.

“This crib is a huge improvement over the last one,” said Koury. “It allows caregivers multiple ways to access the baby if they are sleeping without much disturbance. It’s an amazing piece of technology.”

The hospital also purchased two special vein illuminators, a much-needed item when it comes to treating infants and small children. “This device shines a light on the vein itself, helping to make it easier for technicians to see, and results in less poking and prodding,” said Koury. “It’s really helpful to both patients and technicians.”

Kyson is being honoured with a photo in his memory, which will be hung in the hospital corridor.