18 temperature records smashed

Temperature records were broken around the province with Vernon breaking an 111-year-old record

If you felt the temperature was scorching hot yesterday, you were right.

A total of 18 temperature records were broken on July 6 in the province.

“A strong, upper ridge of high pressure over southern B.C. this week is giving high temperatures,” writes Environment Canada.

At the top of the Okanagan Lake, Vernon hit a scorching 36.9 C, breaking an 111-year-old record set in 1906 of 36.1.

To the northwest, the Kamloops area hit 38.5 C, also breaking a 1906 record of 37.2 C.

According to Environment Canada, Kelowna hit a high of 37.3 C smashing the previous July 6 record set in 1968 of 34.4 C.

Nelson’s mercury topped out at 38.8 C, breaking the 1922 record of 35 C.

And Warfield came in at a blistering 39.7 C, the hottest spot on the record-breaking list, breaking its 1968 record of 37.2 C.

For the last few days and through to the weekend Environment Canada has issued a special hot weather statement for the majority of Southern B.C..

Temperatures are expected to continue to reach the mid to upper 30s through the weekend. Overnight conditions will also remain warm.

Slightly cooler conditions are expected early next week as the ridge weakens and moves to the east.

The heat combined with the warm and dry weather from June has dramatically increased the fire danger rating across much of Southern B.C.

A fire is currently burning near 100 Mile House that reached 1,200 hectares is one day.

Check out the full list below for all of the records broken;

  • Castlegar Area 37.9 (PREVIOUS Record 37.2 In 1968)
  • Clearwater Area 36.9 (PREVIOUS Record 35.6 In 1975)
  • Clinton Area 30.2 (PREVIOUS Record 28.6 In 2015)
  • Hope Slide Area 29.7 (PREVIOUS Record 28.0 In 2015)
  • Kamloops Area 38.5 (PREVIOUS Record 37.2 In 1906)
  • Kelowna Area 37.3 (PREVIOUS Record 34.4 In 1968)
  • Mackenzie Area 28.9 (PREVIOUS Record 28.3 In 2015)
  • Merritt Area 35.7 (PREVIOUS Record 34.4 In 1975)
  • Nakusp Area 35.4 (PREVIOUS Record 33.9 In 2007)
  • Nelson Area 38.8 (PREVIOUS Record 35.0 In 1922)
  • Osoyoos Area 37.8 (TIED Previous Record 37.8 In 1968)
  • Penticton Area 36.5 (PREVIOUS Record 34.4 In 1942)
  • Prince George Area 30.6 (TIED Previous Record 30.6 In 1920)
  • Puntzi Mountain Area 32.0 (PREVIOUS Record 31.1 In 1975)
  • Squamish Area 29.0 (PREVIOUS Record 28.5 In 2011)
  • Vernon Area 36.9 (PREVIOUS Record 36.1 In 1906)
  • Williams Lake Area 31.1 (PREVIOUS Record 30.0 In 1975)
  • Warfield 39.7 (PREVIOUS Record 37.2 In 1968)


 

@carmenweld
carmen.weld@bpdigital.ca

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